the listenerd

optimized for maximum incontinence

Links for 6.29.08: Beck tunes, bad rap names, Craig Finn’s old…

*An open letter from Sasha Frere-Jones to Kanye West. I like Mr. Jones’ magazine articles better than his twitters.

*The Whitburn Project: View a cloud of the top 100 words used in the 37,000 songs that have been on the Billboard charts. Tops: Love.

*EMI is suing Hi5, VideoEgg and other companies (to be named) for copyright infringement.

*Beck has put two new songs from his “Modern Guilt” album on his MySpace page. [absolutepunk]

*Aquarium Drunkard interviews Craig Finn of The Hold Steady: “The record’s really about aging gracefully and I keep coming back to that because rock ‘n’ roll is a tough business to age gracefully in. It’s tough being thirty-six and doing it for a living, and wanting to be an adult and a respectable person who’s able to communicate with other people in other parts of society and not just be rock ‘n’ roll all the time, you know?” This is the part where I remind all of you that I am bald. [rawkblog]

*Read: The Guardian’s love letter to Leonard Cohen.

*The 25 Worst Rap Names: Uncle Murda, Matlock…weird that DJ Jazzy Jeff has been once again snubbed?

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Off topic video: St. Paul smokestack demolished

Vodpod videos no longer available.

[via]

Video: The AirPiano – a no-touch keyboard

More info on the infinitely soothing AirPiano here.
[laughing squid]

Mashup review: Girl Talk’s “Feed the Animals”

Read: A mashup review of Girl Talk’s “Feed the Animals” made from the scraps of other reviews written around the web. Linked version first; unlinked version (far more readable) below. Yes, this is a gimmick. And yes, I only wrote two words of it. And one comma.

***

The element of surprise is gone from the mash-up. Still, Girl Talk, a one-man mash-up mania hailing from Pittsburgh, puts together a mean sampling album – the most recent, Feed the Animals, was released over the weekend on his website.

It’s a typically colorful, animated collection of seamlessly layered samples, with few pretensions to high art: This is a party album through and through, a place where classic rock riffs (Spencer Davis Group, the Guess Who) groove underneath contemporary rap hits and ’80s pop cheese. But Gillis makes some samples sound like brand-new music with a more complicated message: One striking sequence on “Play Your Part (Pt. One)” pairs “Hunger Strike,” Temple of the Dog’s shout-out to poor folks, with Ludacris’ cash-celebrating “What’s Your Fantasy.”

The record’s pacing is astonishing– with more than 150 sample sources (all thanked in the liner notes), it ricochets from Top 40 hits to obscure gems and back again like a cool breeze, clocking in at less than 42 minutes. There is a moment—and I do mean a moment—on Feed the Animals when Jay-Z’s “Roc Boys” is mashed up with Radiohead’s “Paranoid Android” and two of my all-time favorite artists share the room in a geek-out moment to end all.

Attempting to explain Feed The Animals and identify what succeeds or fails with the set can’t be done on the level of an album in its entirety, it’s hard to even approach each track on an individual basis considering what they are. The real fun of Feed the Animals is the act of recognition, so I won’t say much more, except this—Girl Talk’s Feed The Animals makes a great car washing soundtrack.

Unlinked version (see above for attribution):
The element of surprise is gone from the mash-up. Still, Girl Talk, a one-man mash-up mania hailing from Pittsburgh, puts together a mean sampling album – the most recent, Feed the Animals, was released over the weekend on his website.

It’s a typically colorful, animated collection of seamlessly layered samples, with few pretensions to high art: This is a party album through and through, a place where classic rock riffs (Spencer Davis Group, the Guess Who) groove underneath contemporary rap hits and ’80s pop cheese. But Gillis makes some samples sound like brand-new music with a more complicated message: One striking sequence on “Play Your Part (Pt. One)” pairs “Hunger Strike,” Temple of the Dog’s shout-out to poor folks, with Ludacris’ cash-celebrating “What’s Your Fantasy.”

The record’s pacing is astonishing– with more than 150 sample sources (all thanked in the liner notes), it ricochets from Top 40 hits to obscure gems and back again like a cool breeze, clocking in at less than 42 minutes. There is a moment—and I do mean a moment—on Feed the Animals when Jay-Z’s “Roc Boys” is mashed up with Radiohead’s “Paranoid Android” and two of my all-time favorite artists share the room in a geek-out moment to end all.

Attempting to explain Feed The Animals and identify what succeeds or fails with the set can’t be done on the level of an album in its entirety, it’s hard to even approach each track on an individual basis considering what they are. The real fun of Feed the Animals is the act of recognition, so I won’t say much more, except this—Girl Talk’s Feed The Animals makes a great car washing soundtrack.