Links for 3.22.09: Cassette tape art, Quietube, James Joyce…

by Josh Kimball

*Art: Cassette tape portraits will blow your mind into smithereens. If you are not already crazy. [neatorama]

*Visualize: Your life in dots – a visualization wherein each day of the average Americans’ life is represented as a tiny dot on an expansive grid. [coudal]

*Video: Quietube allows you to watch YouTube videos without all the noise by stripping out a bunch of the background garbage. [daring fireball]

*Department of Forgotten Songs: NYT columnist Rob Walker is still looking for help with his Unconsumption tumblr. This blog – probably among others – did, in fact, mention previously that the tumblr was probably about feeling out the market for his next book, though the comment was as much about tumblr being the ultimate platform to jump into publication these days as it was about his topic in particular. Does anyone out there know anything about consumption and/or blogging who could help him?

*Twitter: Tweleted lets one uncover anyone’s deleted Tweets. Not only do I sometimes later delete tweets because I hate them, I also frequently fix typos, word choice or awkwardness. I refuse to apologize for this and if you have any questions you can sod off. [mashable] Also, here are 4.5 lessons from Twitter. I don’t really know if I learned any of them.

*On Language: The wordplay that brings James Joyce and Britney Spears together has to do with the “If you seek” construction.

*Recession: New Jersey’s Fountains of Wayne (the store) may close. DAMN THIS RECESSION ALL TO HELL. I feel like the caps were overplaying it, but that fixing them would make things even worse.

*Blogging: Eric Carle, author of the timeless classic “The Very Hungry Caterpillar,” has a blog. You may not know this, but “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” is a metaphor for our current economic meltdown. [buzzfeed]

*Groups: Bandize is one of those online things that helps bands do all the non-rocking part of being a band. [wired]

*Economics: The crisis is far from over, they say. “If the United States follows the norm of recent crises, as it has until now, output may take four years to return to its pre-crisis level. Unemployment will continue to rise for three more years, reaching 11–12 percent in 2011.”

*Dating: Vine-yl, where Music + Wine always = <3. [coudal]

*Today’s links: D. Dry and lacking in proper quips.

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