Links for October 31, 2011: Slutty Krueger

by Josh Kimball

*Kickstarter: Today, I gave money to a Kickstarter project that will fund Flummox and Friends (from Christa Dahlstrom), a “live-action comedy designed to help kids navigate the social and emotional world.” First, I love the project, and am heartened by it. Second, that quote (and the messaging in toto) contains some pretty savvy language. It’s dripping with latent code that people who are read in the literature of autism spectrum disorder are sure to pick up on. That not a knock on it. The pitch is neurally inclusive, and should be. (If neurally inclusive isn’t a term yet, it will be.) What’s interesting about the project is that its utility for those on the autism spectrum and/or those with Asperger’s gets an explicit mention, but it’s not until the third or fourth item in the list of features.

*Things: Architect Gijs Van Vaerenbergh has designed a transparent steel church. I don’t speak French. (On a side note, I do enjoy sitting at outdoor cafes smoking.) [gijs]

*Intellectual property: Via Murketing comes a story that CNN is reporting; namely, that some people in New York are trying to copyright the phrase “Occupy Wall Street” in order to sell merch. This is a BRILLIANT thought experiment / conceptual art piece. Whether it was meant to be or not.

*Crafts: Apparently, drive-by quilting is the new yarn bombing. (Also, Ricky Tims is “a good-old boy.” Or so I hear.) [mefi]

*Sports: I’m not at all interested in a water skiing chair. But in the event that a water skiing toilet gets invented, you know who to contact. (Me.)

*In memoriam: You’ve seen it before. Maybe you’ve even already read it. But Steve Jobs’ sister, Mona Simpson, wrote a moving tribute to the Apple founder.

*Salty snacks: We’re all thinking it when we see Tom Lyons’ Triscuit Chairs, so I’m just going to go ahead and say it: swiss cheese cushions. [laughing squid]

*Film: OK, this description of Andrew Niccoli’s film “In Time” speaks to me in a BOOMING voice: “In the future, thanks to genetic engineering, everyone’s physical appearance ceases to develop or decline at age twenty-five, at which moment, with a silent, monitory thump, a stop watch on the left forearm—a cross between an Auschwitz serial number and a lime-green digital alarm clock—begins ticking down from one year.”

*Today’s links: F.

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